The Beautiful Game: 1. A Unique Strategy Game

When the Great and Good ABC invented Diplomacy, he created a game that was completely unlike anything in the war-gaming or strategy-gaming world to that point. Even today, there is nothing quite like Diplomacy. At the time, strategy games tended to be 2-player games. There’s nothing wrong with 2-player games, of course, but Diplomacy wasContinue reading “The Beautiful Game: 1. A Unique Strategy Game”

Dealing with Bovine Faecal Matter

In a game like Diplomacy, where the real play takes place off-the-board, and you’re dealing with people whose objective is to persuade you that you’re going to be better off doing this rather than that, there’s a lot of bovine faecal matter flying around. How can you spot it? How do you deal with it?Continue reading “Dealing with Bovine Faecal Matter”

Openings: Seven Reasons to Think Again

Here’s a question a lot of Diplopups (novices) ask, and a lot of Dippyists (players with more experience) like to debate: What’s the best opening moves for each power? There is just one answer to this question, but it isn’t simple: Whatever are the best moves in your situation. There you go. Job done. Pfft.Continue reading “Openings: Seven Reasons to Think Again”

The Grantland Discussions: A Storm of Daggers

Diplomacy is designed to encourage betrayal, there’s no getting away from that. The game is meant to be played by people who communicate; who can forge alliances; who can maintain those alliances long enough to get close to the winning line and then, when that line’s in sight, who are prepared to stab their allyContinue reading “The Grantland Discussions: A Storm of Daggers”

The Grantland Discussions: A Dance with Diversity

In the previous post in this series, I looked at how one Dippyist, Dave Maletsky, felt new players were not finding their way into the Hobby. I think, if we look at the Hobby as a whole, it’s easy to see that it really isn’t very diverse at all. David Hill’s article about the WorldContinue reading “The Grantland Discussions: A Dance with Diversity”

The Grantland Discussions: A Game of Novices

If a hobby such as the Diplomacy Hobby is to survive, then it needs fresh blood. Regularly. It’s like a vampire, except – hopefully – without the killing. Killing new players isn’t going to help things. In his article “The Board Game of the Alpha Nerds” David Hill spoke to a number of Dippyists atContinue reading “The Grantland Discussions: A Game of Novices”

The Grantland Discussions: A Feast for Carebears

By now, unless you’re just jumping into my blog here, you’ll know that Carebearism is not my favourite part of Diplomacy. For me, it has no place at the table, real or otherwise. For others, it’s the way the game should be played. Let’s start by defining what Carebearism actually is. There are, perhaps, threeContinue reading “The Grantland Discussions: A Feast for Carebears”

The Grantland Discussions: A Clash of Styles

One of the reasons Diplomacy is so successful is that it is easily adapted to playing the game in very different ways. Designed to be played face-to-face, it has been played by mail, by email, on websites, on apps, on forums and, most recently, in the virtual FTF form. The rules around deadlines need toContinue reading “The Grantland Discussions: A Clash of Styles”

The Grantland Discussions, Introduction

I don’t know when I came across the Grantland article on Diplomacy, but I’m glad I did. I’ve read a number of articles on the game; this one, “The Board Game of the Alpha Nerds” by David Hill, is the best by far. The reason it works is that it was composed ‘at’ the 2014Continue reading “The Grantland Discussions, Introduction”

Basics of Austria: Dodging Bullets in 1901

It’s been a while since I’ve done a review post, and I’ve been meaning to do one of FloridaMan’s YouTube videos for a while now. So here is his take on Austrian opening moves. Austria-Hungary is notoriously difficult to play. I know a lot of people like playing Austria, either because of the challenge orContinue reading “Basics of Austria: Dodging Bullets in 1901”